Housing Affordability Task Force Recommendation Tracker

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| Published , updated April 25, 2024

In February 2022, the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing’s Housing Affordability Task Force report commissioned by the Province of Ontario provided 55 high-level recommendations to the province to address the housing supply crisis and get homes built faster.

The task force consisted of industry leaders and experts who consulted with stakeholders including municipalities and advocacy groups to develop their report.

The official progress tracker does not list the recommendations the provincial government has not made any progress on, so we’ve re-published the full list here with those recommendations listed as “No reported progress”.

Updated: April 12, 2024. Latest progress report here

NumberRecommendationStatusDetails of implementation
1Set a goal of building 1.5 million new homes in ten years.Fully implementedOntario committed to a target of 1.5 million new homes by 2031 in More Homes Built Faster in mid-2022. Since then, the Province has acknowledged that 1.5 million homes is a baseline and that more action is needed.
2Amend the Planning Act, Provincial Policy Statement, and Growth Plans to set “growth in the full spectrum of housing supply” and “intensification within existing built-up areas” of municipalities as the most important residential housing priorities in the mandate and purpose.In progressFrom April 6 to August 4, 2023, the government consulted through the Environmental Registry of Ontario on a proposed Provincial Planning Statement that includes proposed policy direction on housing and intensification.

An updated proposed Provincial Planning Statement has been posted on the Environmental Registry for consultation. It includes enhanced policies supporting intensification and a range and mix of housing options to meet current and future needs.
3aLimit exclusionary zoning in municipalities through binding provincial actions:
a. Allow “as of right” residential housing up to four units and up to four storeys on a single residential lot.
Implemented with amendmentsThe More Homes Built Faster Act amended the Planning Act by overriding zoning by-laws to allow “as-of-right” (without the need to apply for a rezoning) of up to three units per lot in most existing residential areas. These changes came into effect on November 28, 2022.

March 21, 2024 Premier Ford rejected allowing 4 units as of right and up to 4 storeys:

I can tell you one thing. I heard that announcement from Bonnie Crombie. And I can assure you 1000%, you go in the middle of communities and start putting up four-storey, six-storey, eight-storey buildings, deep into the communities, there’s going to be a lot of shouting and screaming.

That’s a massive mistake. We are not going to go into communities and build four-storey or six-storey buildings besides residences like this. It’s off the table for us. We’re going to build homes, single dwelling homes, townhomes. That’s what we’re going to focus on.

Ontario is also proposing changes to the Planning Act that, if passed, would enhance regulation-making authority related to additional residential units to remove any municipal zoning barriers. A proposed enhanced regulation-making authority could help create additional residential units, such as basement suites, by eliminating barriers including maximum lot coverage and limits on bedrooms allowed per lot.

Municipalities are also encouraged to adopt official plan policies and zoning by-laws that exceed the three unit per lot minimum to help meet their provincially-assigned housing targets. Ontario is supporting this outcome through measures such as the Building Faster Fund, which will provide financial incentives for municipalities that meet or exceed their housing targets.
3bModernize the Building Code and other policies to remove any barriers to affordable construction and to ensure meaningful implementation (e.g., allow single-staircase construction for up to four storeys, allow single egress, etc.).In progressOntario is undertaking an initial exploration of the complex design and safety issues related to allowing a small multi-unit residential building of up to four storeys and up to four units per floor with a single exit stair, while also introducing measures that would ensure no reduction in safety for building residents and firefighters.
4Permit “as of right” conversion of underutilized or redundant commercial properties to residential or mixed residential and commercial use.In progressAn updated proposed Provincial Planning Statement has been posted on the Environmental Registry for consultation. It includes enhanced policies supporting intensification, including through the redevelopment of low-density commercial plazas and strip malls.
5Permit “as of right” secondary suites, garden suites, and laneway houses province-wide.Implemented with amendmentsThe More Homes Built Faster Act amended the Planning Act (s. 16 (3)) by overriding zoning by-laws to allow “as-of-right” (without the need to apply for a rezoning) the use of up to three units per lot in most existing residential areas. One of the three units can be in an ancillary structure, such as a laneway house. These changes came into effect on November 28, 2022.
6Permit “as of right” multi-tenant housing (renting rooms within a dwelling) province-wide.No reported progress
7Encourage and incentivize municipalities to increase density in areas with excess school capacity to benefit families with children.No reported progress
8Allow “as of right” zoning up to unlimited height and unlimited density in the immediate proximity of individual major transit stations within two years if municipal zoning remains insufficient to meet provincial density targets.No reported progress
9Allow “as of right” zoning of six to 11 storeys with no minimum parking requirements on any streets utilized by public transit (including streets on bus and streetcar routes).No reported progress
10Designate or rezone as mixed commercial and esidential use all land along transit corridors and redesignate all Residential Apartment to mixed commercial and residential zoning in Toronto.In progressAn updated proposed Provincial Planning Statement has been posted on the Environmental Registry for consultation. It includes proposed policies that support intensification on lands along existing and planned frequent transit corridors. Intensification could include mixed commercial and residential uses.
11Support responsible housing growth on undeveloped land, including outside existing municipal boundaries, by building necessary infrastructure to support higher density housing and complete communities and applying the recommendations of this report to all undeveloped land.In progressFrom April 6 to August 4, 2023, we consulted through the Environmental Registry of Ontario on a proposed Provincial Planning Statement that includes proposed policy direction concerning greenfield development. We are reviewing feedback and determining next steps to finalize this policy document.
12aCreate a more permissive land use, planning, and approvals system:
a. Repeal or override municipal policies, zoning, or plans that prioritize the preservation of physical character of neighbourhood.
Implemented with amendmentsThe More Homes Built Faster Act amended the Planning Act (s. 41 (4.1)) to limit the scope of site plan control by removing the municipal ability to regulate architectural details and aesthetic aspects of landscape design. This change came into effect on November 28, 2022.
12bCreate a more permissive land use, planning, and approvals system:
b. Exempt from site plan approval and public consultation all projects of 10 units or less that conform to the Official Plan and require only minor variances.
Fully implementedThe More Homes Built Faster Act amended the Planning Act (s. 41 (1.2)) to remove all aspects of site plan control for most residential developments of up to 10 units. This change came into effect on November 28, 2022.
12cEstablish province-wide zoning standards, or prohibitions, for minimum lot sizes, maximum building setbacks, minimum heights, angular planes, shadow rules, front doors, building depth, landscaping, floor space index, and heritage view cones, and planes; restore pre-2006 site plan exclusions (colour, texture, and type of materials, window details, etc.) to the Planning Act and reduce or eliminate minimum parking requirements.In progressChanges are proposed to the Planning Act that, if passed, would remove parking minimums near transit in Protected Major Transit Station Areas and other areas around higher order transit stations and stops (for example, Major Transit Station Areas).

As well, the Ministry of Red Tape Reduction will establish expert tables to explore barriers in municipal zoning and building official recruitment and identify possible solutions that would contribute to time and cost savings for residential development in some of the fastest-growing regions of Ontario.
12dRemove any floorplate restrictions to allow larger, more efficient high-density towers.No reported progress
13Limit municipalities from requesting or hosting additional public meetings beyond those that are required under the Planning Act. No reported progress
14Require that public consultations provide digital participation options.No reported progress
15Require mandatory delegation of site plan approvals and minor variances to staff or pre-approved qualified third-party technical consultants through a simplified review and approval process, without the ability to withdraw Council’s delegation.Implemented with amendmentsThe More Homes for Everyone Act amended the Planning Act (s. 41 (4.0.1)) to require that site plan control decisions be made by staff (instead of municipal councils or committees of council). This change came into effect on April 14, 2022.
16aPrevent abuse of the heritage preservation and designation process by:
a. Prohibiting the use of bulk listing on municipal heritage registers.
Implemented with amendmentsChanges to O. Reg. 9/06 Criteria for Determining Cultural Heritage Value or Interest established that non-designated properties included on a municipal register must meet one or more of the criteria outlined in the regulation.

The More Homes Built Faster Act amended the Ontario Heritage Act (s.27(14) to (18)) to introduce requirements that properties can only remain listed for a maximum of two years and, if not designated during that time, they must be removed from the register and cannot be relisted for a period of five years.
These changes came into effect on January 1, 2023.
16bPrevent abuse of the heritage preservation and designation process by:
b. Prohibiting reactive heritage designations after a Planning Act development application has been filed.
Fully implementedThe More Homes Build Faster Act amended the Ontario Heritage Act (s.29(1.2) 1) to introduce a requirement that only properties that were already listed on a municipal heritage register can be considered for designation where a property is subject to certain Planning Act applications. This new requirement provides property owners with increased certainty and prohibits reactive designation on properties not previously noted as being of potential cultural heritage value or interest to a municipality. These changes came into effect on January 1, 2023.
17Requiring municipalities to compensate property owners for loss of property value as a result of heritage designations, based on the principle of best economic use of land. No reported progress
18Restore the right of developers to appeal Official Plans and Municipal Comprehensive Reviews.Implemented with amendmentsSchedule 9 of the More Homes, More Choice Act removed restrictions on “de novo” hearings by repealing sections 38 to 42 of the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal Act. This broadened the grounds of appeal and supports the Ontario Land Tribunal in making the best planning decision.
19Legislate timelines at each stage of the provincial and municipal review process, including site plan, minor variance, and provincial reviews, and deem an application approved if the legislated response time is exceeded.Implemented with amendmentsThe Planning Act includes statutory decision-making timelines with an ability for applicants to appeal matters to the Ontario Land Tribunal if timelines are not met.
This is addressed through gradual fee refunds for rezoning and site plan if decisions are not made within timelines.
20Fund the creation of “approvals facilitators” with the authority to quickly resolve conflicts among municipal and/or provincial authorities and ensure timelines are met.Fully implementedThe Helping Homebuyers, Protecting Tenants Act amended the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Act (subsections 12 (2) and (3)) to allow for the appointment of up to four Deputy facilitators.
21Require a pre-consultation with all relevant parties at which the municipality sets out a binding list that defines what constitutes a complete application; confirms the number of consultations established in the previous recommendations; and clarifies that if a member of a regulated profession such as a professional engineer has stamped an application, the municipality has no liability and no additional stamp is needed. No reported progress
22Simplify planning legislation and policy documents.In progressFrom April 6 to August 4, 2023, we consulted through the Environmental Registry of Ontario on a proposed Provincial Planning Statement that would replace the Provincial Policy Statement and A Place to Grow: Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe. We are reviewing feedback and determining next steps to finalize decisions about these policy documents.
23Create a common, province-wide definition of plan of subdivision and standard set of conditions which clarify which may be included; require the use of standard province-wide legal agreements and, where feasible, plans of subdivision.No reported progress
24Allow wood construction of up to 12 storeys.Fully implementedAmendments to Ontario’s Building Code (Ontario Regulation 451/22) allow encapsulated mass timber buildings to be constructed up to 12 storeys high. This came into effect July 1, 2022.
25Require municipalities to provide the option of pay on demand surety bonds and letters of credit.In progressWe will be consulting on the development of a potential regulation that would authorize landowners to choose the instruments (such as pay-on-demand surety bonds) to secure municipal conditions of land use.
26Require appellants to promptly seek permission (“leave to appeal”) of the Tribunal and demonstrate that an appeal has merit, relying on evidence and expert reports, before it is accepted.In progressChanges are proposed to the Planning Act that, if passed, would limit third-party appeals for official plan and zoning by-law amendments.
27aPrevent abuse of process:
a. Remove right of appeal for projects with at least 30% affordable housing in which units are guaranteed affordable for 40 years.
In progressChanges are proposed to the Planning Act that, if passed, would limit third-party appeals for official plan and zoning by-law amendments.
27bPrevent abuse of process:
b. Require a $10,000 filing fee for third party appeals.
Implemented with amendmentsThe Ontario Land Tribunal has the authority and processes in place to deter appeals that are without merit.
Third-party appeals for consents and minor variances were eliminated as a result of amendments to the Planning Act made by More Homes Built Faster Act. This means only certain persons, such as the applicant or relevant municipality are allowed to appeal minor variance or consent decisions.
Increasing the filing fees for third-party appeals may result in access to justice concerns.
27cPrevent abuse of process:
c. Provide discretion to adjudicators to award full costs to the successful party in any appeal brought by a third party or by a municipality where its council has overridden a recommended staff approval.
In progressAmendments to the Ontario Land Tribunal Act (OLTA) set out in Schedule 7 of the More Homes Built Faster Act (once in force) will clarify the Ontario Land Tribunal’s powers to order an unsuccessful party to pay the successful party’s costs in accordance with the OLT’s rules.
28Encourage greater use of oral decisions issued the day of the hearing, with written reasons to follow, and allow those decisions to become binding the day that they are issued.Fully implementedThe Ontario Land Tribunal is providing updated training to members to encourage use of oral decisions, when appropriate.
In many cases, the complexity of the matter before the tribunal may require the member to reserve the decision in order to consider the evidence presented and applicable legislation and policies.
29Where it is found that a municipality has refused an application simply to avoid a deemed approval for lack of decision, allow the Tribunal to award punitive damages.No reported progress
30Provide funding to increase staffing (adjudicators and case managers), provide market-competitive salaries, outsource more matters to mediators, and set shorter time targets.In progressOntario announced cumulative additional funding investments (For example, 14.7M over three years starting in April 2022 and $11.8M over three years starting in April 2023) for the Ontario Land Tribunal (OLT).

Implementation of additional resources by the OLT has been in progress. The OLT expanded its expert mediation services in summer 2023 and is targeting to complete its recruitment of additional adjudicators and staff, as well as implement key new online services by spring 2024.

Public consultation for proposed new regulations to set OLT service standards (for example, timelines for completing specific case resolution activities) and case prioritization criteria will start by March 2024 through Ontario’s Regulatory Registry.
31In clearing the existing backlog, encourage the Tribunal to prioritize projects close to the finish line that will support housing growth and intensification, as well as regional water or utility infrastructure decisions that will unlock significant housing capacity.In progressAmendments to the Ontario Land Tribunal Act (OLTA) set out in Schedule 7 of the More Homes Built Faster Act (once in force) will allow regulations to be made that would:

-set criteria to prioritize resolution of certain OLT case
-set service standards, including timelines for the OLT to complete specific case resolution activities

Public consultation for the proposed new regulations will start in by March 2024 through Ontario’s Regulatory Registry.
32Waive development charges (DC) on all forms of affordable housing guaranteed to be affordable for 40 years.No reported progress
33Waive development charges (DC) on all forms of affordable housing guaranteed to be affordable for 40 years.In progressOntario has introduced changes to the Development Charges Act that would, if passed, incorporate income factors in addition to market factors in developing a definition of “affordable residential units”. Affordable homes that meet the province’s definition would be eligible for discounts and exemptions on development-related fees to help lower the cost of building, purchasing and renting.
34Prohibit interest rates on development charges higher than a municipality’s borrowing rate.Fully implementedThe More Homes Built Faster Act made changes to the Development Charges Act, 1997 (s.26.3) to set a maximum interest rate that can be levied for the development charge freeze and deferral provisions of the Canadian Banks prime rate plus 1% per year. The maximum interest rate applies as of June 1, 2022.
35aRegarding cash in lieu of parkland, s.37, Community Benefit Charges, and development charges:
a. Provincial review of reserve levels, collections and drawdowns annually to ensure funds are being used in a timely fashion and for the intended purpose, and, where review points to a significant concern, do not allow further collection until the situation has been corrected.
Implemented with modificationNew regulatory provisions were made in support of the More Homes for Everyone Act to increase the transparency of development-related charges. These amendments require a municipal treasurer to include in their annual treasurer's statement whether the municipality still anticipates incurring the capital costs projected for a given service in the municipal development charges background study.

If not, an estimate of the anticipated amount the municipality now projects incurring would be provided along with an explanation for the variance. Similarly, if there was no spending from a DC reserve in a year, the municipality must also provide an explanation for this. These regulatory amendments were filed and came into force on April 27, 2022.)

We also made changes to the Planning Act and the Development Charges Act to provide greater cost certainty for municipal development-related charges. The changes build transparency and accountability for parkland review and development charges.
35bExcept where allocated towards municipality-wide infrastructure projects, require municipalities to spend funds in the neighbourhoods where they were collected. However, where there’s a significant community need in a priority area of the City, allow for specific ward-to-ward allocation of unspent and unallocated reserves.No reported progress
36Recommend that the federal government and provincial governments update HST rebate to reflect current home prices and begin indexing the thresholds to housing prices, and that the federal government match the provincial 75% rebate and remove any clawback.No reported progress
37Align property taxes for purpose-built rental with those of condos and low-rise homes.No reported progress
38Amend the Planning Act and Perpetuities Act to extend the maximum period for land leases and restrictive covenants on land to 40 or more years.Fully implementedThe More Homes Built Faster Act amended the Planning Act (s. 50(3)) to allow land lease communities with leases for periods of up to 49 years to be exempted from subdivision control approval if a land lease communities proposal has gone though the site plan control process. This change came into effect on November 28, 2022. Perpetuities Act change is not required.
39Eliminate or reduce tax disincentives to housing growth.In progressThe Ontario government is taking steps to remove the full 8% provincial portion of the Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) on qualifying new purpose-built rental housing in order to get more rental homes built across the province.

Ontario welcomes the federal government's decision, following our longstanding call, to provide HST relief for new purpose-built rental housing.

Together, the provincial and federal actions would remove the full 13% HST on qualifying new purpose-built rental housing in Ontario, helping to get more housing built. Ontario will continue working closely with the federal government to implement this new measure.
40Call on the federal government to implement an urban, rural and northern Indigenous housing strategy.Fully implementedOntario has called on the federal government to implement an urban, rural and northern Indigenous housing strategy through a number of ministerial-level bilateral correspondence and has raised the issue at both bilateral and multilateral (federal/provincial/territorial) meetings.
41Funding for pilot projects that create innovative pathways to homeownership, for Black, Indigenous, and marginalized people and first-generation homeowners.No reported progress
42Provide provincial and federal loan guarantees for purpose-built rental, affordable rental and affordable ownership projects.No reported progress
43Enable municipalities, subject to adverse external economic events, to withdraw infrastructure allocations from any permitted projects where construction has not been initiated within three years of build permits being issued.In progressWe have proposed legislative changes that, if passed, would create a new municipal servicing management tool and enhance lapsing provisions for draft plans of subdivision and condominium approvals and introduce discretionary lapsing authority for site plan approvals.
44Work with municipalities to develop and implement a municipal services corporation utility model for water and wastewater under which the municipal corporation would borrow and amortize costs among customers instead of using development charges.No reported progress
45Improve funding for colleges, trade schools, and apprenticeships; encourage and incentivize municipalities, unions and employers to provide more on-the-job training.Fully implementedOntario is investing to build and upgrade training centres. The funding will help unions, Indigenous centres, and industry associations build new training centres, or upgrade and convert existing facilities into new training centres with state-of-the-art equipment and technology.

The new capital stream will be open to a wide range of applicants in in-demand industries and support facility expansions, renovations, repairs and retrofits, and new building construction.
46Undertake multi-stakeholder education program to promote skilled trades.Fully implementedOntario has invested more than $1 billion in the skilled trades over three years, along with the launch of Skilled Trades Ontario, as part of its strategy to attract more people into the trades.

Recently, Ontario announced it is expanding its successful skilled trades career fairs called Level Up!, now in its second year, to even more cities with more exhibitors and twice as many participating students. This is a series of dynamic, multi-day career fairs highlighting the 144 skilled trades, from electricians to boilermakers. Over 25,000 students in grades 7 to 12, as well as parents and jobseekers, will have the opportunity to learn about these trades through interactive exhibitions and hands-on activities while hearing directly from tradespeople and local employers.

A new mandatory high school graduation requirement will ensure all students take at least one grade 9 or 10 technological education credit starting with students entering grade 9 in September 2024. This will help better prepare students across the province for the jobs of tomorrow.

Ontario is investing through the Apprenticeship Capital Grant program, helping 66 training institutions across Ontario upgrade their training equipment and existing facilities that support hands-on learning for students and apprentices.
47Recommend that the federal and provincial government prioritize skilled trades and adjust the immigration points system to strongly favour needed trades and expedite immigration status for these workers, and encourage the federal government to increase from 9,000 to 20,000 the number of immigrants admitted through Ontario’s program.Fully implementedThe Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) plans to use 40% of its 16,000 allocation in 2023 to nominate individuals in the skilled trades and have made changes to the Expression of Interest scoring system to award more points to candidates in priority occupations/sectors.

In 2022, Ontario sought and received a significant increase to its Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) allocation from 9,750 in 2022 to 16,500 in 2023, which will increase to over 18,000 by 2025.

The federal government is also prioritizing selection of some skilled trades occupations through category-based selection and Ontario will encourage the targeting of additional occupations through federal immigration selection programs.
48The Ontario government should establish a large “Ontario Housing Delivery Fund” and encourage the federal government to match funding. This fund should reward:
Annual housing growth that meets or exceeds provincial targets Reductions in total approval times for new housing The speedy removal of exclusionary zoning practices
In progressOn August 21, 2023, Ontario announced the new Building Faster Fund, a $1.2B three-year program that will provide funding to municipalities based on performance towards annual housing targets.

Once implemented in early 2024, this program will, in tandem with the federal government's Housing Accelerator Fund:

support growth in housing supply
incentivize reduction in approval timelines
incentivize removal of exclusionary zoning practices
49Reductions in funding to municipalities that fail to meet provincial housing growth and approval timeline targets.In progressOn August 21, 2023, Ontario announced the new Building Faster Fund, a $1.2B three-year program that will provide funding to municipalities based on performance towards annual housing targets.

Municipalities that fail to meet at least 80% of their annual target will receive no funding and those meet 80% to 99% of their target will receive reduced funding.
50Fund the adoption of consistent municipal e-permitting systems and encourage the federal government to match funding. Fund the development of common data architecture standards across municipalities and provincial agencies and require municipalities to provide their zoning bylaws with open data standards. Set an implementation goal of 2025 and make funding conditional on established targets.In progressThrough the Streamline Development Approval Fund, we are providing more than $45 million to Ontario's 39 largest municipalities to modernize and accelerate housing approval processes, including implementation of e-permitting systems.
In addition, a Data Standards approach is in development to support a common data architecture standard.
51Require municipalities and the provincial government to use the Ministry of Finance population projections as the basis for housing need analysis and related land use requirements.In progressFrom April 6, 2023 to August 4, 2023, the government consulted through the Environmental Registry of Ontario on a proposed Provincial Planning Statement that includes proposed policy direction to make land available for future population growth, which includes planning for future residential growth. We are reviewing feedback and determining next steps to finalize this policy document.
52Resume reporting on housing data and require consistent municipal reporting, enforcing compliance as a requirement for accessing programs under the Ontario Housing Delivery Fund.Implemented with amendmentsThrough the Municipal Planning Data Reporting Regulation (O. Reg 73/23), which was filed April 6, 2023, 29 large and fast growing municipalities are now required to provide the ministry with planning application data for five planning instruments on a regular basis.

The Building Faster Fund provides funds to municipalities that meet or exceed their annual housing targets by 2031. Ontario is working with municipal partners on reporting monthly data and tracking progress.
53Report each year at the municipal and provinciallevel on any gap between demand and supply by housing type and location, and make underlying data freely available to the public.Implemented with amendmentsWe have published the progress towards housing targets for all 50 municipalities on the housing supply progress tracker. The progress includes data on housing starts, additional residential units and long term care beds.
54Empower the Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing to lead an all of government committee that meets weekly to ensure our remainingImplemented with amendmentsIn fall 2023, a Deputy Minister’s Housing Working Group was established to leverage the existing efforts and structure of the Deputy Minister’s Infrastructure Committee (DMIC). For the housing-focused agenda items, additional Deputy Ministers will be added to the group to ensure an all-of-government approach is undertaken.
55Commit to evaluate these recommendations for the next three years with public reporting on progress.Fully implementedOntario committed to public reporting through this tracker on Sept 7, 2023.
Appendix B1. Call upon the federal government to provide equitable affordable housing funding to Ontario.Fully implementedOntario continues to advocate for municipalities and Ontarians to receive their fair share of funding from the federal government. These additional revenues would flow to municipal service providers to ensure Ontarians can get the housing they need.
Appendix B2. Develop and legislate a clear, province-wide definition of “affordable housing” to create certainty and predictability.In progressOntario has established an “affordable residential unit” definition that was updated by Bill 134, the Affordable Homes and Good Jobs Act, 2023, to include income factors, for the purposes of providing discounts and exemptions from municipal development-related charges (MDRCs).

We intend to bring into force the updated definition and the municipal development-related charge (MDRC) exemptions and discounts for affordable residential units on June 1, 2024, and publish a bulletin entitled, “Affordable Residential Units for the Purposes of the Development Charges Act, 1997 Bulletin” on Ontario.ca.

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